Winslow Boy, The

MPAA Rating: G

Entertainment: +3

Content: +3 1/2

In London in 1911, the very genteel, moderately well to do Winslow family is experiencing some difficulties. Their thirty year old, politically active daughter, Catherine (Rebecca Pidgeon), is engaged to be married, but is having second thoughts. Their older son, Dickie, has dropped out of college and is threatening to join the military. Then comes the devastating blow that their 13 year old son, Ronnie (Guy Edwards), has been expelled from the naval military academy he is attending. He has been found guilty by the school's authorities of stealing a postal money order. However, Ronnie vehemently denies this. His dignified, upright father, Arthur (Nigel Hawthorne), believes him and launches a concerted effort to prove his son's innocence. This eventually leads Arthur to employ one of the most astute young attorneys in England, Sir Robert Morton (Jeremy Northam), to defend Ronnie. The case, catching the imagination of the press and the people, takes on national interest. Acting in the film is superb, but the soft spoken English accents are sometimes difficult to understand. This story of very proper Englishmen and a rather simple plot could have become stale and uninteresting. Instead, all the intriguing character interactions, plot twists and surprises make for a very engrossing story.

The Winslow Boy proves again that a G-rated film can be a very entertaining experience for older teens and adults. The proper English dialogue is virtually devoid of offensive language and the only sexually suggestive event occurs when Catherine's fianc kisses her passionately. Most of the scenes take place in the genteel atmosphere of the Winslow's home, so violence is not an issue in the film. Liquor is consumed socially a few times in their home, but the Winslows are a God honoring family who attend church, and Arthur Winslow reads the Bible for guidance in difficult times. He also is willing to risk his reputation and wealth to clear his son. Attorney Robert Morton pursues his case to prove Ronnie innocent with great zeal and even personal sacrifice. He truly is determined that "right will be done". And it subtly becomes apparent that he has a romantic interest in Catherine, but their relationship is proper in all respects. The Winslow Boy is a very refreshing, exceptional film which we heartily recommend. Don't miss it.

Preview Reviewer: John Evans
Distributor:
Sony Pictures Classics, 550 Madison Ave, 8th Floor, NY,NY 10022

Summary
The following categories contain objective listings of film content which contribute to the subjective numeric Content ratings posted to the left and on the Home page.

Crude Language: None

Obscene Language: None

Profanity: Exclamatory Only -Twice (Oh God, Oh Lord)

Violence: None

Sex: None

Nudity: None

Sexual Dialogue/Gesture: None

Drugs: Few Times - Liquor consumed socially, toast proposed with wine

Other: Family attends church and father reads Bible for guidance, attorney and father both sacrifically defend boy's innocence.

Running Time: 104 minutes
Intended Audience: Older teens and adults.


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